Tag Archives: poetry

Prompt April 21 2020

Photo by form PxHere

Today is the birthday of Queen Elizabeth II. So let us think about female royalties. What pops in your head when you hear the word queen. Crown royalty? Queen of hearts? Queen bee? Queen of rock? Queen of Soul? The queen disk of Carrom? The band Queen? Brainstorm your ideas about the word queen. Also, keep in mind what Shakespeare said about the royal head.

“Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.”
— Shakespeare Henry IV

Once you have jotted down your ideas, connect them in a poem.

As usual, you can post your poem here if you like. You will need a password. Write to theliterarynest@gmail.com if you need the password.

Prompt April 20 2020

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Humans are suffering right now, and many are experiencing personal tragedies. While this pandemic runs its course, locked down humans create an incredible opportunity for nature to regenerate. Just yesterday, I saw an oriole enjoying a birdbath. Let’s hope once we are free to move around in the world that we decide to live in harmony with nature.

Here are a couple of short poems about the orioles. Both are in the public domain, so I can reproduce them here.

To an Oriole
by Edgar Fawcett

How falls it, oriole, thou hast come to fly
In tropic splendor through our Northern sky?
At some glad moment was it nature’s choice
To dower a scrap of sunset with a voice?
At some glad moment was it nature’s choice
To dower a scrap of sunset with a voice?
Yearning toward Heaven until its wish was heard,
Desire unspeakably to be a bird?

Sir Oriole
by Amos Russel Wells

“This is a merry world,
Truly a jolly world”—
So sings the oriole.
He is a winged flame,
He bears a lighted breast,
Sunshine incarnated.
His is a swinging song,
His is a swinging nest,
His is a swinging flight.
Ever a-tilt is he,
Tilting at gloominess,
Happy Sir Oriole!

Write a poem about oriole or any other bird you choose. Enjoy.

As usual, you can post your poem here if you like. You will need a password. Write to theliterarynest@gmail.com if you need the password.

Prompt April 19 2020

 

A good poem is more than just words. It also sounds pleasant to an ear. But today’s prompt isn’t about the meter or other sound devices in poetry. It’s about the sounds that you have internalized. Certain sounds such as ice-cream truck jungle might transport you back to those warm summer days of your childhood, or a sound of sleigh bells will bring back happy memories of Christmas. Hearing an ambulance siren of a firetruck alarm may bring awful memories if you ever had to encounter these sounds during personal tragedies. Sometimes even the seemingly happy sounds may trigger unhappy memories if those sounds are associated with the sad times in your own life. Think about a sound that either makes you happy or sad or triggers some bittersweet feelings within you. Write a poem about that sound.

As usual, you can post your poem here if you like. You will need a password. Write to theliterarynest@gmail.com if you need the password.

Prompt April 18 2020

Today’s prompt is about Anaphora.
Anaphora is the intentional repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of a sentence or a clause. For example, Biblical Psalms often repeated the phrase “O Lord” at the beginning of each line of a prayer. Anaphora is a popular rhetorical device used for added emphasis in spoken word poetry and speeches. The repetition adds cadence, and it sounds rhythmic and hence easy to memorize, not to mention the emotional impact.

Have you ever counted the number of occurrences of the phrase, “I have a dream” in Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr speech?

“I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: “We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal.” I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at a table of brotherhood. I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state, sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice. I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. I have a dream today.”

Read it aloud to feel the impact.

Read Charles Dickens’s opening of “A Tale of Two Cities.”

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair.”

Additionally, check out the lyrics to the song “I Envy the Wind” by Lucinda Williams.

Write a poem that makes use of anaphora.

As usual, you can post your poem here if you like. You will need a password. Write to theliterarynest@gmail.com if you need the password.

Prompt April 17 2020

image source unknown

 

So, we are past the halfway mark. How many poems have you written this month? How many have you posted? Give yourself a pat on the back for your dedication and perseverance.

On to the next prompt. Think of a time when you were scared — I mean really scared. What things/people/events scare you? Fear may be paralyzing in real-time, but looking back at that time, think about how your feelings have changed? Write a poem in any poetic form of your choice.

As usual, you can post your poem here if you like. You will need a password. Write to theliterarynest@gmail.com if you need the password.

Prompt April 16 2020

image from uwaterloo.ca

Let us do an experiment today.  Do some free-writing using your non-dominant hand.  Try to fill a whole page. Writing by hand increases neural activity in certain areas of the brain. It also forces you to slow down and allows more time to think.  Using a non-dominant hand can strengthen the current neural area, and it also helps to grow new connections. This will allow you to tap into creative thought patterns.

Write a poem using the ideas found in the free-writing above.

As usual, you can post your poem here if you like. You will need a password. Write to theliterarynest@gmail.com if you need the password.

Prompt April 15 2020

 

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Find ten words that have the same vowel sounds. Some examples are

Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers (repeats the short e and long i sounds)
A host of golden daffodils” (repeats the long o sound)
Don’t let the cat out of the bag. (repeats short a sound)
Never mix business with pleasure. (repeats short i sound)

Use the ten words you have listed above in your poem repetitively to create pleasurable sound effects.
In simple poetic terms, use assonance in your poem. 🙂

As usual, you can post your poem here if you like. You will need a password. Write to theliterarynest@gmail.com if you need the password.

National Poetry Month April – Write with us

The month of April is designated as National Poetry Month, a time to celebrate poetry and poets. The tradition was initiated by the Academy of American Poets in 1996. Since then many other poetry organizations have followed the tradition. The aim is to

  1. highlight the extraordinary legacy and ongoing achievement of American poets,
  2. encourage the reading of poems,
  3. assist teachers in bringing poetry into their classrooms,
  4. increase the attention paid to poetry by national and local media,
  5. encourage increased publication and distribution of poetry books, and
  6. encourage support for poets and poetry.

There are many ways to celebrate the month and many are listed on the Academy of American Poets website.

To honor the poets and poetry and encourage the writing of serious poetry,  I am offering a community page where poets around the world can write a poem-a-day (or as many days as you want to) during the month of April 2020. I will provide a daily prompt for inspiration, but you don’t have to follow the prompt. As an additional incentive, if you write a great sonnet I might feature in the summer issue. The page will be password-protected to retain the future publication rights of the poet. This activity is totally free. There’s no charge to participate. So, sharpen your pencils. You have the whole month of March to do that.  Go ahead, sign up and see you in April. To sign up for the activity, leave a comment below and send your email contact to theliterarynest@gmail.com by March 30th, so I can send you the password. I will open the page for writing on April 1.

National Poetry Month April 2019


Welcome to National Poetry Month.
What are you doing to celebrate this year? Are you reading poetry? Writing? Carrying a poem in your pocket to share with everyone you meet?  Attending poetry readings? Whatever you do, make it count for the sake of poetry. In my opinion, poetry and math keep the world from going insane in the turmoil of life and the world around you.

I am doing an innovative fundraiser for Tupelo Press.

“Rainbow arcs and honey-laced milk,
These are a few of the things I won’t seek”

But I do seek your support.

I am in a “marathon” this month with ten other poets, writing a poem every day, and raising funds for Tupelo Press. We invite family, friends, and colleagues to sponsor us (for instance at a per poem rate, for instance, $3/poem x 30 poems = $90). Every dollar you spend is a vote for my poetry, and for poetry in general!

Running an actual marathon might be a little easier than writing a poem every day, it turns out. You should try it, but in lieu of writing your own poems, you can read mine!

If you know me, you know I care about my work, and it is a big risk to put such fresh work on public display before I have a chance to edit, to perfect it, and hear a public opinion. I wasn’t sure I could do it. Some days I am still not. I need to hear from you, my family and friends, my own fan club! Can you take a little time to look at my poetry?

Tupelo Press is a prestigious non-profit press, for seventeen years their mission has been to publish new voices. They are giving my work some exposure, and bringing me into a community of over 350 alumni helping each other publish our work.

Today you have a chance to help one of the few, and one of the best non-profit independent publishers we have. To help them survive and continue to put more poets into print. Here is what you are supporting:

■ Independent literary publishers are mission-driven—they focus on publishing literature.
■ Independent literary publishers provide access to the voices of entire communities.
■ Independent literary publishers produce over 98% of poetry being published each year,
and the majority of literature in translation and works of fiction by emerging writers.

There are so many ways you can support the press. A subscription to fabulous books of poetry, sent to your home. A one-time donation at any level. I hope you consider supporting me, and supporting this amazing press I am representing this month.

Warmly,
Pratibha